Career Planning

The Increasing Concerns Regarding Accidents And Trauma Worldwide

Child labor is another topic that is being addressed with vigor world over. The global number of children engaged in child labor declined by one-third between 2000 and 2012 (246 million dropping to 168 million). More than half (85 million) are engaged in hazardous work. Agriculture remains the most important sector utilizing child labor (98 million). Child nutrition improving child nutrition remains a global imperative. According to data from UNICEF (2013), stunting affects 165 million children under 5 years of age. This problem can be mitigated by interventions during maternal pregnancy and before the child is 2 years. Today we are currently living in a world where we either hear of or witness something traumatic every single day of our lives. Either we see some kind of fatal accident on the road, right in front of our eyes, or we hear about such accidents and natural disasters taking the lives of many on the TV or the radio every day. Because the world has come to that point. That we simply can’t escape this in our day to day lives. But the only consolation that we get through something like this is that there are steps being taken to minimize this crisis as much as possible world over. We are currently in the midst of a global trauma epidemic. It is estimated that 5.8 million people die each year as a result of injury and trauma. At least 2 million of these deaths are potentially avoidable. Injuries are a significant and increasing cause of mortality and morbidity which makes people end up in places like disability employment services, where most of the individuals are trying hard to lead a life to the best of their ability. Around 5 billion people do not have access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed, particularly in LMICs. Many of those who do access care risk personal financial ruin. The WHO estimates that, by 2030, trauma from road traffic accidents will be the third most common cause worldwide of both mortality and disability. The Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care (WHO 2004) have established a core list of 11 essential trauma care services. The implementation of these recommendations has been hampered by deficiencies in planning and infrastructure that need to be addressed by national governments.

This is the reason the International guide lines for essential trauma care were put into place and they are also called ‘rights of the injured’, because the injured have the right to the appropriate treatment, in order to make sure they don’t have to be signed into disability job agencies Melbourne in the future because they didn’t receive the appropriate treatment at the correct time. And these guidelines include steps like making sure obstructed airways are cleared and maintained, impaired breathing is supported until the injured person is self-ventilating, making sure a pneumothorax or haemothorax is promptly relieved. Any bleeding should be stopped promptly with the necessary methods being used. The team that arrives at the scene of trauma should be competent enough to recognize a patient in shock and treat them with IV fluids. Traumatic brain injury should be recognized immediately along with correcting any disabling extremity injuries. And if spinal cord injury is suspected the patient should be immobilized and transported in the appropriate manner. And once the patient has reached the hospital a thorough examination is necessary along with administering the appropriate treatment for the already recognized injuries.